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The Travelers by Chris Pavone




The Travelers by Chris Pavone

What makes a good spy book come to life?  How does  a writer of suspense and intrigue bring out the subtleties of his characters?  These questions are answered with honesty and creativity in Chris Pavone's new novel, The Travelers.  Many  know of Chris' other works such as The Accident and The Expats, but his work is new to me.  While I was a little unsure about what to expect in this novel, I was caught up in the story line and the characters.

The novel is broken up into various parts aligned with the different characters.  The main story follows Will Rhodes, a travel writer for the magazine The Traveler.  Will takes his writing to new levels as he visits Ireland, Great Britain, France and other international destinations.  Little does he know that at one venture, after a steam night with a lady named Elle, not his wife, that his life would never be the same.  He is thus ushered into a  new life as CIA operative that takes on the role as agent listening in on the conversations of the rich, famous, and powerfully ruthless, to ascertain their hidden agendas.  His boss, Malcolm, at the publishing magazine, is also in on this game without letting Will know.

While I really enjoyed the book, the part played by Chloe, Will's wife seemed a bit predictable yet understandable.  She really opened the lid of inquiry after Will replaced the windows in their home for a substantial amount paid in cash.  She had the hunch to follow Will in her quest to find out if Will was really cheating on her or if he was up to something.  I can imagine my own wife doing the same thing, looking into the truth of the matter.  But I wonder if Chris goes a little too far in having Chloe leave after finding out about Elle, which she knows nothing about.

The cat and mouse game of suspense, of not knowing who is going to find out about Will and his undercover role is part of the allure of this book.

Thanks to Blogging for Books for the copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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