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Murder is No Accident





Murder is No Accident: A Hidden Springs Mystery by A.H. Gabhart

This the first book by A.H. Gabhart, known as Ann H. Gabhart to many, that I've read and it was a fast paced and intriguing work of fiction.  One of the key elements of the story is the cantankerous nature of the characters in the story, from Deputy Michael Keane, to Aunt Lindy, and Reece, each member at some point in the story rubs each other wrongly and suspicions remain.  In any good story, there must be a bit of uneasiness in the plot that moves the story along.  I found this book to be amusing and easy to follow, and the clues were there to keep you guessing.

The story centers around a small town that holds within it the Chandler residence, a mansion that is on the market, an owner of the house, the aged Miss Fonda, the real estate agent Geraldine Harper, sheriff Michael Keane and other characters.  The plot thickens when a body is found at the bottom of the steps to the tower room.  One of the amusing scenes in the book is an exchange between Vernon, Betty Jean and the sheriff.  Vernon says, "I'm going to miss that Geraldine, she was a go-getter for sure....We'll all miss her, but we better hurry if we want to get table at the Country Diner."  Betty Jean looked ready to grab the man's arm and tug him out the door." (61)  Life goes on in small towns, even when tragic events take place, and this is best seen in the Friday catfish dinner at a local restaurant called Country Diner.

This book was an adventurous tale into the lives of a small town, especially when tragedy strikes more than once.  My favorite character in the book was Deputy sheriff Michael Keane, his keen eye for putting the clues together, his friendship with others, and his ability to weed out the unnecessary for the important clues.  Thrown into the mix of the book is his relationship with Alex and his feelings about patrols in a small town.  I think you will enjoy this book as much as I did.

Thanks to Revell books for the copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.


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