Skip to main content

Great Books for Women

Here is a short list of books for women that engage issues related to spiritual formation, suffering, God's promises and the gospel that are really good:


Elyse is a writer that is saturated in the gospel of God's grace.  From start to beginning, you will be encouraged, challenged, and refreshed by Elyse's passion for Christ and God's Word.  This book is a look into the Book of Romans from a gospel perspective.  She just released a book entitled Found in Him: The Joy of the Incarnation and Our Union with Christ that is not to be missed either.  Both of these titles are from Crossway
http://www.amazon.com/Found-Him-Incarnation-Union-Christ/dp/1433533235/ref=tmm_pap_title_0
http://www.amazon.com/Comforts-Romans-Celebrating-Gospel-Time/dp/1433533197/ref=pd_sim_b_3

 

Catherine Campbell is a wonderful author who revels in the promises of God.  Catherine is a former nurse in Belfast who worked with in the Royal Victoria Hospital.  Married to Philip, a minister of a congregational church in Coleraine.  Catherine tells her story in Under the Rainbow of bearing two young girls, Cheryl and Joy, who were born with microcephaly, a neurological condition which results in abnormal growth of the brain.  Her setbacks and struggles are set forth honestly and she never wavers from holding onto the God of all comfort.  Here other book, Rainbows for Rainy Days is 40 devotional readings designed to reveal God's promises to its readers.  This devotional is a solid source of hope and encouragement and has been passed around in my family to many.
http://www.catherine-campbell.com/



Seasons of the Heart is a collection of devotions from women who mainly lived in the 18th-19th centuries.  Donna Kelderman complied this wonderful collection and I know it will be a hit for many. Some of the women included are Susannah Spurgeon, Mary Winslow, Ruth Bryan among others.  The devotions are thematically arranged and include such topics as suffering, widowhood, God's Son, Dealing with Discontment.  http://www.heritagebooks.org/seasons-of-the-heart-a-year-of-devotions-from-one-generation-of-women-to-another/

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

My Favorite Color is Blue. Sometimes.: A Journey Through Loss with Art and Color

My Favorite Color is Blue. Sometimes by Roger Hutchison

Taking a look at the digital copy of this book allowed me to look at the striking art inside the book, and its connection to the words of the page that were focusing on loss.  Looking at the physical copy of the book even brings to life more the staggering similarity that the words and pain have together on the page.  The focus here is how certain colors express the sentiments of those who have lost a loved one.  I did not think that I would relate too well to this book until two days ago, as we lost our little boy, who was only 17 weeks old.  The pain is palpable and yet the pages of this book give me good reason to think of my son with a sense of pride and hope.

Roger writes, "You are a shooting star. Your light trails across the heavens.  I blinked and you were gone."  We were full of anticipation at the first and second ultrasounds, and there was the picture of our little boy Jackson, his developing face and little …

The Catholic Novelist in the Protestant South

Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose by Flannery O’Connor
A profound simplicity of thought, a penetrating vision of what it means to be human, Flannery O’Connor embodies the spirit of bringing fictional stories to life.  Others might call her fiction ‘grotesque’ in a rather unflattering manner, but O’Connor was not content to live up to their criticisms.  In this short book of collected essay and lectures, Mystery and Manners, editors and friends of Flannery, Robert and Sally Fitzgerald have given us a glimpse into the vision of her faith, style and life as a writer.   A lifelong Catholic, Flannery O’Connor sought to wed together the moral integrity of her faith with the character of her craft in writing.  Specifically, fiction for her was an exploration in imitation.
In a rather illuminating statement in the chapter entitled, “A Catholic Novelist in the Protestant South, “ O’Connor writes,
“I am specifically concerned with fiction because that is what I write.  There is a certain em…